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5yr old kid with a very rare blood clotting disorder successfully treated for Brachial plexus at Wadia Hospital

Dr-Minnie-Bodhanwala-with-P

Hospital helped family with financial constraint, and treated kid for free

  • Combination of Factor VII deficiency and brachial plexus injury is very uncommon.
  • Factor VII deficiency is considered the most common of rare bleeding disorders its incidence is estimatedat 1 per 300,000-500,000

5 yr old Deepika Yadav from Raichur district, Karnataka  was successfully treated for a very rare birth defect with a very rare blood clotting disorder at Bai Jerbai Wadia Hospital, Parel. She was having right sided brachial plexus injury and Factor VII deficiency. Brachial plexus injury is about nerves of the upper limb are stretched inadvertently during difficult delivery leading to poorly functioning arm.

Dr-Minnie-Bodhanwala-with-P

Factor VII deficiency is a blood clotting disorder that causes excessive or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. With factor VII deficiency, your body either doesn’t produce enough factor VII, or something is interfering with your factor VII, often another medical condition. Factor VII is a protein produced in the liver that plays an important role in helping your blood to clot. It’s one of about 20 clotting factors involved in the complex process of blood clotting.

 The brachial plexus is the network of nerves that sends signals from your spine to your shoulder, arm and hand. A brachial plexus injury occurs when these nerves are stretched, compressed, or in the most serious cases, ripped apart or torn away from the spinal cord. Babies sometimes sustain brachial plexus injuries during birth.

Deepika had a very limited ability to lift her right arm above shoulder and on MRI; she had a posterior dislocation of the humeral head. She was evaluated and advised surgery of the right shoulder by shoulder muscle transfer. During a routine work up investigations for surgery, it was revealed a persistent deranged bleeding profile (prolonged Prothrombin time) which was not corrected even on medication. After further thorough evaluation by the team Wadia it was notified that Deepika had a disorder in which Factor VII was deficient. The hematologists advised Factor VII administration whose cost was very expensive. A 1 mg vial of rNOVO7 costs Rs.48000 and as per estimate by hematologists she would require at least 18-19 vials which cost 9 lacs approximately. Due to financial constraints of the laborer father who had 6 dependents the surgery was deferred.

Dr. Minnie Bodhanwala, CEO, Wadia Hospitals says, “After consultation with the hematologists of Wadia Hospital, they played a vital role of making a protocol for the surgery. This surgery was performed under cover of Factor VII infusion (rNOVO7) uneventfully. The rNOVO7 was given every 4th hourly for the 48 hours and then reduced to 8th hourly after that. It has now been stopped and there is no bleeding. Without this treatment she would have bled uncontrollably, and surgery would have been impossible for this child. This child needed corrective surgery to reconstruct the shoulder, or which would result in inability to use the arm.”

Deepika’s Father says, “We had approached many hospitals in Karnataka but was unsuccessful in our endeavor. BJ Wadia hospital stepped up to this challenge and treated my daughter free of cost and we are very grateful to them”.

 “We at Wadia Hospitals are always ready to take such challenge to operate and treat such cases. This case was one of its kinds and the rarest one. Fewer than 200 cases of such cases are reported globally till date and our medical team has successfully performed once again”. says Dr Minnie.

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